stuff you should know

and a few things you shouldn't.... but i'll tell you anyways.

im jus here to be here.

Ask me anythingNext pageArchive

  “A scarlet steam engine was waiting next to a platform  packed with people. A sign overhead said Hogwarts Express, eleven o’clock. Harry looked behind him and saw a wrought-iron archway where the barrier had been, with  the words Platform Nine and Three-Quarters on it.
  Smoke from the engine drifted over the heads of the chattering crowd, while cats of every color wound here and there between their legs. Owls hooted to one another in a disgruntled sort of way over the babble and the scraping of heavy trunks.”

Happy September 1st, y’all!

(Source: stannisbarathcon, via safeinmyarmsx3)

imfeelingmildlysatisfiedand slightly sleepy and my keyboard is messed up but thats okay cause yeah.t

hope everyonehas a nice nigh t

12yearsaking:

Look at him appreciate cultures without wearing them as a costume. It’s that easy.

(Source: bluemoonwalker, via yourcupofcoffee)

"

Why is it that people are willing to spend $20 on a bowl of pasta with sauce that they might actually be able to replicate pretty faithfully at home, yet they balk at the notion of a white-table cloth Thai restaurant, or a tacos that cost more than $3 each? Even in a city as “cosmopolitan” as New York, restaurant openings like Tamarind Tribeca (Indian) and Lotus of Siam (Thai) always seem to elicit this knee-jerk reaction from some diners who have decided that certain countries produce food that belongs in the “cheap eats” category—and it’s not allowed out. (Side note: How often do magazine lists of “cheap eats” double as rundowns of outer-borough ethnic foods?)

Yelp, Chowhound, and other restaurant sites are littered with comments like, “$5 for dumplings?? I’ll go to Flushing, thanks!” or “When I was backpacking in India this dish cost like five cents, only an idiot would pay that much!” Yet you never see complaints about the prices at Western restaurants framed in these terms, because it’s ingrained in people’s heads that these foods are somehow “worth” more. If we’re talking foie gras or chateaubriand, fair enough. But be real: You know damn well that rigatoni sorrentino is no more expensive to produce than a plate of duck laab, so to decry a pricey version as a ripoff is disingenuous. This question of perceived value is becoming increasingly troublesome as more non-native (read: white) chefs take on “ethnic” cuisines, and suddenly it’s okay to charge $14 for shu mai because hey, the chef is ELEVATING the cuisine.

"

- One of the entries from the list ‘20 Things Everyone Thinks About the Food World (But Nobody Will Say)’.  (via scumila)

(Source: crankyskirt, via afrojabi)

future-punk:

The Second Renaissance
helloyoucreatives:

 
cruelladetrillaa:

This speaks volumes.

Why I will not attend the ISNA (August 2014) and RIS (December 2014) conferences

tariqramadan:

In recent years I have been a faithful participant in two major events of the North American Muslim calendar. As a regular attendee at these annual gatherings, I wish to express my warmest thanks to the institutions, and to the women and men who made them the success they…